Seed

Promoting seed sovereignty: farmer control of seed, a seed system in the public interest

Union Farmer Newsletter: June – July 2021
In this issue NFU Priorities for the Next Policy Framework NFU comments to Health Canada on regulating gene-edited products – By Cathy Holtslander Maintaining public trust in food system requires public regulation – By Lucy Sharratt Greyhound’s exit paves the way for a national public transit system, says NFU Should Canada trade away Supply Management? Read more
Op Ed: Seed is key to the kingdom
By Cathy Holtslander This Op Ed was originally published by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives on The Monitor Online. On March 31, newly confirmed United States Trade Representative (USTR) Katherine Tai published the 2021 National Trade Estimate (NTE) Report detailing perceived significant trade barriers for U.S. exports. Eleven pages are devoted to Canada, including a section Read more
Submission to Health Canada on proposed new guidance for Novel Food Regulations
All gene-edited products should be regulated as novel and therefore subject to government safety assessment and pre-market notification. This would ensure Health Canada maintains its ability to regulate foods derived from gene-edited plants in the public interest. It would ensure farmers have access to the information they need to make informed choices about the seed they purchase and crops they grow. Read more
Action: Health Canada Public Consultation on Gene-edited Plants
Demand mandatory disclosure and safety assessments for all gene-edited plants! Take action by sending an email to Health Canada. Read more
Union Farmer Newsletter: April 2021
In this issue … Seed For Food System Resilience: Private versus Public Interest – by Cathy Holtslander Canada’s seed variety system is in US trade crosshairs – by Cathy Holtslander US farm groups and unions ask Biden to end CUSMA attack on Canada’s supply management systems – by Cathy Holtslander Vegetable Seed Snapshot   Seed For Read more
Action Alert: Your CFIA survey response is critical for seed quality and access to seed!
The federal government is doing a major review of the Seeds Act Regulations. The push for this review comes from multinational seed corporations that want the rules radically changed to serve their own interests. The first opportunity for farmers to provide input to let the government know what we need and want is a CFIA stakeholder survey to get input on potential changes to how seed is regulated in Canada. Please fill it in after reading the background information below. The deadline is Monday March 15. There is a link to the survey at the bottom of this message. Read more
Union Farmer Newsletter: February 2021
In this issue … Save our Seed! Do the CFIA seed survey today! Farmland concentration a growing problem in Canada, warns report – by Lois Ross Ranchers, First Nations unite against Rocky Mountain coal mining – by Steve Edgerton   Save our Seed! Do the CFIA seed survey today By Cathy Holtslander, NFU Director of Read more
Letter to Minister Bains – Objection to business name “Seeds Canada”
The NFU objects to the use of “Seeds Canada” as this entity’s business name on the grounds that, by connoting it is a government department or agency, it is contrary to the Canada Business Corporations Act Regulations, Section 26. Read more
NFU says “Seeds Canada” name misleading, asks Minister to disallow
“Using the name “Seeds Canada” while advancing its members’ private interests through lobbying, surveillance and regulatory activities would surely cause confusion about government’s role in seed policy, regulation and enforcement,” said NFU member Cam Goff. “This jeopardizes the government’s reputation, and it calls Canada’s democratic values and public interest into question. Read more
Union Farmer Newsletter: October 2020
Articles in this issue: Seed Canada vote signals farmers can’t be taken for granted; Hairy canola— a big deal!; Solving climate crisis key to saving family farms: NFU has lead role in both struggles; More local, regional abattoir capacity needed; Alberta changes legislation to allow more on-farm slaughtering Read more
Back to Top