Comment approvisionner les restaurants en produits du NB – une co-propriètaire de restaurant et fermière partage son opinion
Nous avions déjà été restaurateurs pendant sept années quand, il y a six ans, nous avons commencé à pratiquer l’agriculture. Le tout a commencé lorsque nous avons pensé qu’il fallait trouver une façon de nourrir nos trois garçons et notre fille qui grandissaient.
A system that leaves producers out by design
New Brunswick wild blueberry producers have faced one of the hardest seasons in history.
Un système qui laisse les producteurs de côté à dessein
Les producteurs de bleuet sauvage du N.-B. ont fait face à une des plus difficiles saisons de leur histoire.
Churchill Worth Saving
Most of us take for granted that the majority of our roads and highways are publicly funded and built at cost in order to serve the overall public good.
Bottling Canada’s Food Policies – What the debate over ketchup says about the future of farming
The recent social media splash made over French’s ketchup highlights what the National Farmers Union (NFU) has been talking about for years – food sovereignty matters.
Our beef is not just with Earl’s – a better system is within reach
Earl’s sourcing decision also highlights Canada’s need for a more diversified beef system that would create more value for both farmers and consumers.
Rail Service on Vancouver Island is Essential for Economic Development, Sustainable Agriculture and Food Sovereignty
The Nanaimo and Capital Regional Districts and several First Nation funders are unhappy with the lack of progress made by the Island Corridor Foundation to re-instate rail service between Victoria and Courtenay with a branch line to Port Alberni.
Democracy, supply management threatened
published in the Western Producer, February 4, 2016 The Trans-Pacific Partnership’s Investor State Dispute Settlement mechanism gives foreign corporations the right to sue our government if they believe their future profits will be reduced as a result of democratically enacted measures. While ISDS puts a chill on public interest regulation, the TPP also has more insidious
Bill 6 Benefits For Farmers Are Far-Reaching
On December 10, 2015, the Alberta Provincial Government passed Bill 6 – the Enhanced Protection for Farm and Ranching Workers Act. Until this time, farm and ranch employers were not required to register with the Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB) or provide any form of workplace insurance for employees. The Farming and Ranching Exemption regulation didn’t allow health and safety inspectors to enter or conduct investigations on farms and ranches where people, including children, have been seriously injured or killed. It is estimated that between 1990 and 2015, 9,000 workers have sustained injuries requiring hospitalization and approximately 400 people have lost their lives on Alberta farms and ranches. 65 were children.
Benefits of farmers’ workplace insurance are far-reaching
I have the good fortune of living and working in a rural community and I have also had the privilege of working with individuals and families whose livelihoods depend on farming and ranching. In addition to this, I am proud to be a member of a multigenerational farming family. Over the years I have observed a trend in regard to farm related injuries and the economic and social ramifications for those who are not covered by workplace insurance.