Policy: 2024

NFU Submission to the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food on Issues relating to the Horticulture Sector
NFU Submission to the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food on Issues relating to the Horticulture Sector

The NFU is pleased to provide comments to support the Committee’s study on issues relating to the horticultural sector, particularly insurance programs and federal assistance granted to the horticultural sector, with a focus on the effectiveness of insurance programs and the one-time assistance available to address climate hazards.

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NFU Testimonies – Senate Study on Soil Health in Canada
NFU Testimonies – Senate Study on Soil Health in Canada

To promote soil health, we need common-sense solutions that ensure farmers have the security of tenure. We need a system that does more to protect farmland for farmers and food producers, and that prevents large-scale consolidation of land by outside actors that financialize land, turning it into a commodity to be exploited rather than an irreplaceable ingredient necessary to sustain us.

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NFU comments on proposed PMRA continuous oversight of pesticides
NFU comments on proposed PMRA continuous oversight of pesticides

As stated in a previous submission to the PMRA, the NFU affirms that the powers under the Act appear to be sufficient to authorize continuous oversight, but there are opportunities for it to be strengthened. The NFU is also supportive of the proposals outlined in “The Proposed Policy on Continuous Oversight of Pesticides'' by the PMRA. The NFU believes that the implementation of continuous oversight (CO) in the PMRA’s evaluation process aligns with our values in regard to the precautionary principle, and at the same time supports the PCPA’s mandate.

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NFU Testimony – Issues relating to the Horticulture Sector
NFU Testimony – Issues relating to the Horticulture Sector

We are here to address the climate impacts threatening the economic viability of our farms. We also face a rapid rise in costs of production accompanied by downward pressure on the price we can command. The farmer’s share of the consumer food dollar is small, so grocery store price increases disproportionately benefit the large retailers. Increasing ownership concentration in wholesale and food processing further depresses our returns. Falling returns are creating a structural deficit: the difference is being taken out of the land, farm workers' labour and the farmers income.  Failure to address these issues means ever fewer Canadian horticulture farms, less of our food being grown in Canada, vulnerability to environmental, political and economic conditions in the countries our imported produce comes from. 

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